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Thread: KNOW YOUR SHERIDAN RIFLES AND PISTOLS

  1. #11
    Bill,
    Since you mentioned how you got your Crosman, I thought I'd share how I got my Sheridan.
    This is a chapter in my autobiography, MEMIORS OF A MISSOURI COUNTRY BOY.



    The True Story of How I Got
    My First Sheridan Blue Streak

    I kept my Daisy Red Ryder oiled, and I oiled my BBs, so it always shot hard. It took innumerable sparrows, but by fourth grade, I really needed more power and range. Ads in the sporting magazines convinced me that I needed a Sheridan Blue Streak pneumatic .20 caliber air rifle.

    Dad wasn’t as easy to convince as I was.

    I didn’t realize it, but apparently we were poor. Well, we really weren’t poor because we had lots of love in the family. But, we didn’t have very much money.

    It appeared that I would have to fund the Blue Streak myself. So, I delivered 32 copies of the Quincy Herald Whig seven days a week throughout my small hometown of Wayland, Missouri. That town of 300 inhabitants was so small that I delivered papers out of the city limits in three directions on my bicycle.

    I was lucky to be raised in such a small town. No one paid any attention to a kid carrying a gun down Main Street. I knew that if I could just get a Sheridan, I’d be able to use it.

    Even after I had the money, Dad still wasn’t convinced that a Blue Streak would be a wise investment of my hard earned money.

    I desperately needed more power. So, with the assistance of my uncle Delbert, my cousin Mark (Delbert’s son) and I started building firecracker guns. (I didn’t mention my endeavor to Dad.)

    The firecracker guns employed ¼” gas pipe wired onto a wooden stock. A hole was drilled in a cap that was threaded onto the back of the gas pipe. The cap was unscrewed and a firecracker was inserted with the fuse coming out of the hole. After installing the cap, a foam wad was pushed down the barrel, followed by a ¼” lead ball, followed by another foam wad. I lit the fuse with a cigarette lighter and I HAD POWER!! Not much accuracy, but lots of power.

    Unfortunately (or, perhaps, fortunately for my health), Dad found out about the firecracker guns. He did a quick mental calculation and determined that my medical bills from the firecracker guns were likely to cost much more than a Blue Streak. So he confiscated the firecracker guns with the promise that he would get me a pneumatic.

    The day he arrived home with an airgun box, I could hardly contain my excitement. But, when I unboxed it, I was sorely disappointed. Instead of a Blue Streak, he had gotten a Benjamin 3100 pneumatic BB rifle (probably because BBs were lots cheaper than Sheridan .20 caliber pellets).

    Dad and his father were both outstanding shots with rifle and shotgun. They were market hunters, so they had to be. They spent a whole afternoon trying to get that Benjamin to shoot reasonable groups. They finally gave up.

    Dad took the Benjamin back.

    I got my Blue Streak.

    I miss you, Dad.

  2. #12
    Bill,
    In the same power plant, the lighter .177 pellets obtain higher velocities and flatter trajectories.
    But, I've always felt that if you can put a pellet in a vital area of a varmint, the more air and light you let into him, the faster he will expire.

    Of course, on a small varmint, either caliber is adequate. But when you get to tough critters like ground squirrels, tree squirrels, crows, etc, the bigger the hole you can put in them, the better.

    Hawkeye Wizard

  3. #13
    Bill,
    You asked in an above post about the effectiveness of .177 versus .22.
    I actually got a good deal of experience with .177, .20, and .22 on ground squirrels.
    Terminal effectiveness was directly proportional to caliber.
    The bigger the caliber, the faster they went down.
    Here's a true story of how I got my experience.
    Hawkeye Wizard


    GROUNDSQUIRREL GOLF

    I hired Bob to work with me at Rock Island Arsenal.

    It didn’t take long for me to find out that we had much in common. We both loved guns ---any guns --- in fact, anything that launched a projectile.
    We shot bows, airguns, and firearms together. We attended gun shows together. We drove gravel backcountry roads reducing the ground squirrel populations.

    One day, Bob mentioned that a golf course near Eldridge, Iowa had a serious ground squirrel problem.
    The little rascals were wreaking havoc on the course. Their holes and mounds were everywhere.
    Golfers often complained about losing balls down ground squirrel holes.

    Bob approached the golf course manager, offering our professional services. An agreement was reached.

    The golf course owner agreed to provide us with a cart, two score cards, and free cold pop. We agreed to reduce the ground squirrel population at NO COST to the course.

    The owner did specify two restrictions.
    We couldn’t “work” on weekends because the course was crowded with golfers.
    And, we couldn’t “work” on Thursdays because it was lady’s day. Heaven knows, we wouldn’t want to offend the sensibilities of any lady golfers.

    Regularly, Bob and I would show up at the course. We’d load the rear of a cart with a variety of cased air rifles.
    Then we’d pick up scorecards and Cokes, and head out on the course.

    We’d take turns driving. When one of us spotted a ground squirrel, the driver would angle toward the prey, not driving directly at him, but rather, closing the distance at an angle.
    When either of us felt he could make the shot, he’d say “Close enough.”
    The driver would stop and the optimist would take a shot. If he missed, the other one would get a shot.

    On our scorecards, headshots counted for 3 points, body shots for 2, anything that got into it's hole before expiring counted 1, and misses were a 0.

    Our best day eliminated fifty three of the little hole diggers.

    The course owner was grateful for our help. So were the golfers.

  4. #14

    Friend HW

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye Wizard View Post
    Bill,
    You asked in an above post about the effectiveness of .177 versus .22.
    I actually got a good deal of experience with .177, .20, and .22 on ground squirrels.
    Terminal effectiveness was directly proportional to caliber.
    The bigger the caliber, the faster they went down.
    Here's a true story of how I got my experience.
    Hawkeye Wizard


    GROUNDSQUIRREL GOLF

    I hired Bob to work with me at Rock Island Arsenal.

    It didn’t take long for me to find out that we had much in common. We both loved guns ---any guns --- in fact, anything that launched a projectile.
    We shot bows, airguns, and firearms together. We attended gun shows together. We drove gravel backcountry roads reducing the ground squirrel populations.

    One day, Bob mentioned that a golf course near Eldridge, Iowa had a serious ground squirrel problem.
    The little rascals were wreaking havoc on the course. Their holes and mounds were everywhere.
    Golfers often complained about losing balls down ground squirrel holes.

    Bob approached the golf course manager, offering our professional services. An agreement was reached.

    The golf course owner agreed to provide us with a cart, two score cards, and free cold pop. We agreed to reduce the ground squirrel population at NO COST to the course.

    The owner did specify two restrictions.
    We couldn’t “work” on weekends because the course was crowded with golfers.
    And, we couldn’t “work” on Thursdays because it was lady’s day. Heaven knows, we wouldn’t want to offend the sensibilities of any lady golfers.

    Regularly, Bob and I would show up at the course. We’d load the rear of a cart with a variety of cased air rifles.
    Then we’d pick up scorecards and Cokes, and head out on the course.

    We’d take turns driving. When one of us spotted a ground squirrel, the driver would angle toward the prey, not driving directly at him, but rather, closing the distance at an angle.
    When either of us felt he could make the shot, he’d say “Close enough.”
    The driver would stop and the optimist would take a shot. If he missed, the other one would get a shot.

    On our scorecards, headshots counted for 3 points, body shots for 2, anything that got into it's hole before expiring counted 1, and misses were a 0.

    Our best day eliminated fifty three of the little hole diggers.

    The course owner was grateful for our help. So were the golfers.

    _________________________


    Friend HW:


    Thank you.......


    Sounds like you really enjoyed your "work"..........


    Best accuracy.....................22 or .177?


    And why?


    Your friend, BC


    _________________


    PS:


    I just finished your 2nd addition, for the second time.......excellent....and thank you again for giving it to me, and signing it like you did.


    If you ever do a 3rd addition, what about mixing in some of your air rifle stories along with the technical data?

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Breezy Eastern Kansas
    Posts
    24

    Bob

    If your Bob passed away just over a year ago, we lost a great firearms engineer and an even greater friend. I had the opportunity to shoot some of the prototypes he was engineering..one was a .308 on a 1911 frame. As a single shot pistol enthusiast I found it quite interesting and no harsher to shoot that my Contenders. .it’s to bad he wasn’t into RFBR.You chose a good man to work with and to be friends with. I’m sorry I didn’t know him better. Losing friends you grow up with is the worst thing about getting old. Keep the stories coming.

    Brian

  6. #16
    Brian,
    Yeah, it's undoubtedly the same Bob. I miss him often.
    Ron

  7. #17
    Bill,
    You asked about .177 versus .22 accuracy.
    Here's an honest answer ----- it depends.

    Airgun accuracy is very highly dependent on pellet selection, range to target, and environmental conditions.

    Pellet brand, pellet weight, and pellet shape significantly affect any airgun's accuracy. Unlike the .22LR world where projectile shape and weight are fairly standard, in the airgun world every caliber of pellets can be purchased in a large range of weights and shapes.

    All high $ target rifles and pistols are .177. So at 10 meters indoors, I'd say that .177 shooting wadcutter pellets at a muzzle velocity of 400 to 550 fps has the edge in pure accuracy.
    But outdoors and/or at longer ranges those wadcutter pellets are very poor.

    Outdoors in the wind, .22 caliber round nose pellets will drift far less and retain their velocity much better.

    Given the same powerplant putting the same amount of energy into both .177 and .22 pellets, the lighter .177 pellets have significantly greater muzzle velocity. But they shed that velocity quickly. At longer ranges I believe that .22 has the edge in both energy and accuracy.

    Also the nature of the powerplant can drastically affect an airgun's accuracy potential. Spring piston guns are notoriously hold sensitive and difficult to shoot accurately. Pneumatic and PCP (precharged pneumatic) guns are much, much easier to shoot accurately. CO2 guns suffer from velocity sensitivity to ambient air temperatures.

    If I had to pick a rifle/pellet for outdoor accuracy at reasonable distances (20 yards to 70 yards) I'd shoot a .22 caliber PCP rifle with JSB midweight pellets at a muzzle velocity of 800 to 900 fps.

    A great resource for airgun specs, pellet specs, and customer reviews is Pyramyd Air. I go there often.

    Does this answer your question?

    Hawkeye Wizard

    P.S. Have you gotten that trigger that you wanted me to test?

  8. #18

    Friend HW

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye Wizard View Post
    Bill,
    You asked about .177 versus .22 accuracy.
    Here's an honest answer ----- it depends.

    Airgun accuracy is very highly dependent on pellet selection, range to target, and environmental conditions.

    Pellet brand, pellet weight, and pellet shape significantly affect any airgun's accuracy. Unlike the .22LR world where projectile shape and weight are fairly standard, in the airgun world every caliber of pellets can be purchased in a large range of weights and shapes.

    All high $ target rifles and pistols are .177. So at 10 meters indoors, I'd say that .177 shooting wadcutter pellets at a muzzle velocity of 400 to 550 fps has the edge in pure accuracy.
    But outdoors and/or at longer ranges those wadcutter pellets are very poor.

    Outdoors in the wind, .22 caliber round nose pellets will drift far less and retain their velocity much better.

    Given the same powerplant putting the same amount of energy into both .177 and .22 pellets, the lighter .177 pellets have significantly greater muzzle velocity. But they shed that velocity quickly. At longer ranges I believe that .22 has the edge in both energy and accuracy.

    Also the nature of the powerplant can drastically affect an airgun's accuracy potential. Spring piston guns are notoriously hold sensitive and difficult to shoot accurately. Pneumatic and PCP (precharged pneumatic) guns are much, much easier to shoot accurately. CO2 guns suffer from velocity sensitivity to ambient air temperatures.

    If I had to pick a rifle/pellet for outdoor accuracy at reasonable distances (20 yards to 70 yards) I'd shoot a .22 caliber PCP rifle with JSB midweight pellets at a muzzle velocity of 800 to 900 fps.

    A great resource for airgun specs, pellet specs, and customer reviews is Pyramyd Air. I go there often.

    Does this answer your question?

    Hawkeye Wizard

    P.S. Have you gotten that trigger that you wanted me to test?


    ___________________


    Friend HW:


    Yes, thank you.....


    My old Crosman was 22 cal......


    I had a long conversation with Anthony DiOrio a few days ago....


    He's getting close to having prototypes of his XP style, center grip trigger, and soon thereafter his rifle version.


    If I get to test one of the rifle versions, I'll ask him to allow me to send it to you, to test.


    Your friend, BC

    ______________________


    PS:


    HW, the Remington pattern trigger, itself, is a handicap to accuracy shooting.......I've written about the issues with it for years...


    Of all the light pull, target versions of the Remington pattern trigger, the simple, three lever design probably affects accuracy in a negative way the least of them all.

    The main reason, is because the tip of the third lever is a direct link to the trigger sear itself.......whereas, all the other versions have an intermediary link between what would be their third lever, and the trigger sear itself.


  9. #19

    I've got to butt in here.......sorry...

    I've got to butt in here.......sorry...


    CYA friends:


    I just looked outside.......absolutely dead calm.........


    They're shooting right now at Livonia......


    Dead calm...




    I heard that the "girl with a pistol" will be at Livonia tonight...........maybe.....




    Your friend, BC

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